PAUL ANDREW DUNKER

Firm supporter of the oxford comma.

STRAND // BRITTANY, FR

The coast of Brittany, France is absolutely incredible. On the western coast of the country, the cold Atlantic ocean meets tall, rocky cliffs that give way to fields of wildflowers and dense forests.

The rocks along the coast are particularly beautiful. Made up of layer after layer of granite left behind by periods of intense volcanic activity, the diagonal sheets of granite have been worn by thousands of years of waves, wind and sand. Beautiful gold, green, and white splashes of moss provide a pop of color against the gray and black granite.

I love shooting this series around the world. Each beach is completely different, providing a new challenge, a new inspiration. Brittany has been by far the most challenging, and most rewarding, yet.

PANORAMIC STITCHING

When packing for a two-week trip to Europe, I decided to leave my Nikon D600 and lenses at home, and instead take my Fuji x100s and a small set of filters. This compact camera has a great 16MP CMOS sensor and an incredibly well-matched 35mm-equivalent f2.0 lens.

The only downside for me is that I print very large, and a 16MP image will print about 13x19 at native resolution. To make up for this, I often shoot a panorama and stitch multiple images together. 

For this image captured on the coast of Brittany, France, I stitched six images together with the camera in portrait orientation. I overlap each image by about 60%, to make sure that I have plenty of pixels to work with where they overlap. These are all 30-second exposures at f8.0.

I used a B+W 10-stop ND filter and a Lee Filters 3-stop hard edge graduated ND to bring the exposure down in the sky. After several months of experimenting with Lee filters, however, I’ve grown increasingly dissatisfied with the coloration of these particular filters. The ND filters all have a very intense blue coloration to them that I find extremely difficult to correct for. My Tiffen 3-stop ND has a slight warm/reddish cast, but it’s very easy to correct. My B+W 10-stop is actually completely color-neutral, so I am at the point where I plan on selling my Lee filter set and purchasing a second B+W 10-stop. 

I will definitely miss the convenience of the filter holder and the quick release system, but color accuracy is much more important to me.